Thank you for your interest in Response Protection Corp. We have over 95 years of experience in:

  • Firefighting
  • Law Enforcement
  • Homeland Security

RPC’s premier safety and fire suppression products raise the safety level for all responders working in dangerous or hazardous conditions

“I feel that this hood affords me the greatest protection of any hood I have worn. In addition to be being the safest it is also the most comfortable hood I have ever worn”

~ Dennis Amodio - FDNY-Rescue 1 (ret.). Now live burn flashover instructor.

Recent News

The Capt. Jim Fire Hood, now manufactured by FireDex in Ohio has made tremendous strides in the past few months. Our sales have soared leading us to have to ramp up production to keep our dealers in stock. We have added new dealers on the east coast and in Ohio and Wisconsin to better serve those firefighters who make the choice to improve their safety. We welcome aboard dozens of departments who have purchased the Capt. Jim Fire hood to equip their members including the city of Atlantic City, NJ. We continue to build our network of dealers out to speed up the delivery and equipping of our firefighters with increased safety.

We thank those who have supported us and look forward to providing our hood and safety products to those departments and firefighters who contact us daily.

The logo on our hood states “WE GOT IT”. A term known by all firefighters that signifies a job well done. A fire that met its match by the units there. “WE GOT IT”… the training, the leadership, the courage and the equipment needed, including the Capt. Jim Fire Hood. Get yours now!

Stay safe… stay aware… two of the keys to a safe operation.

Wash Your Hood!

Protecting Yourself from Harmful Particulates

The IAFF, the Firefighter Cancer Support Network and other health organizations have issued some warnings to firefighters about the dangers of a higher risk of cancers in firefighters necks, faces and jaws from carcinogenic particulate that may be trapped in the protective material of your hood. These particulates are from the soot and smoke absorbed into your PPE and hood during fire operations. These absorbed particles can contain chemicals that can be absorbed through the skin during subsequent wearing of the dirty hood and attack the organs in your body including the brain. The report from the Firefighters Cancer Support Network (a) stated that firefighters are showing increased risk of a several types of cancers such as prostate cancer, testicular cancer, multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. We need to act to help protect ourselves immediately.

We recommend that every firefighter be equipped with a minimum of two (2) hoods. Do not feel that “I’ll get one good one and a cheap one for backup”. Fires don’t occur around your hood washing schedule. You may have just washed your “good” one after an auto fire and then quickly roll into a structural fire. Make sure you have two “good” ones. The two hoods are a necessity to allow for the cleaning and drying of one hood while the firefighter uses the second hood. We applaud the effort that is now out there for the “Wash Your Hood Sundays” as a step in the right direction. However, we feel that the threat of cancer needs to be fought more aggressively. We are urging all Chief Officers to institute a policy and all firefighters to adopt the habit whereby every responding member’s hood is washed thoroughly after any call where smoke or fumes are present. Your unit may not have operated but may have been exposed to the smoke or fumes from the operation. The presence of smoke or fumes should be the trigger for washing the hood. Washing the hood on Sundays is a great idea but the thought that you may catch a job Sunday evening and continue to wear that particulate laden hood for a week causes concern. Should you have a week with no fire duty then make sure you wash the hood on Sunday.

The important thing to find is a good hood that can withstand numerous washings. The more washings the hood can hold up to the better it is from a durability standpoint. The durability needs to be considered along with the TPP, comfort and safety factors commonly associated with the hood. The Capt. Jim Fire Hood was washed tested 100 times with minimal degradation of properties. Inquire as to the wash limits of your hood and keep track of your total washings.

It is very important that the correct method of hood washing is followed to insure the continued safety levels of the product. That information should be included with the hood or available from the manufacturer.

New technologies are being developed in hood design and construction. Look into them and familiarize yourself with them. Check each out carefully before you buy. The fastest safety steps you can now take is to increase the frequency of washing the hoods as well as the other PPE ensemble. We urge all firefighters to wash the hood after every run where smoke or fumes are present and as a minimum to wash the hood every Sunday. Take the steps to stay safe, get your second hood to help fight cancer.

Stay safe!

(a) Firefighter Cancer Support Network report (8/2015)
– Taking Action Against Cancer in the Fire Service

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